The most worthy proposals for a tax increase tend to generate a strong coalition of community leaders stepping forward to educate the public about the need and championing the identified solution.

We tend to look at problems as being discrete, single-issue things, with a cause or set of causes that, once identifi ed and analyzed, can be solved with a discrete focused solution.

If there’s a single defining trait reflected in nearly every issue important to Gunnison County this election season, it’s that change is afoot.

In the face of near-constant reminders of just how unaffordable housing has become and corresponding fixes that rely in some form on subsidy, it’s refreshing to hear — alternatively — that a local government is reconsidering its land-use regulations.

Big change is afoot in the Gunnison community. And I’m not referring to the recent addition in our arsenal of fast food joints — although, sadly, my teenage kids would tell you that’s one of the most exciting developments they’ve seen in their home town.

Each week, I am startled, heartened, thrilled by the intelligent, articulate reports I read in the Country Times. Last week’s edition was no exception, but yet another prime example.

The recent launch of a new school of engineering and computer science and the adoption of a simplified name are but the latest bold moves by Western Colorado University aimed at setting the Gunnison institution apart from competitive peers.

By Leslie Nichols

As your superintendent responsible for administering the affairs of our public school district, I feel compelled to ensure that accurate information is available on Amendment 73.

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