I bumped into Matt Carpenter on Manitou Avenue early Sunday afternoon. He was sitting outside his ice cream shop, waiting for a customer. I had just completed the epic Pikes Peak Marathon race that he owned for the better part of two decades.

First came the bare human foot, somewhere in Africa. Then, in no particular order, the moccasin, the shoe, the horse and saddle, boat and oar, the ski, the snowshoe and so much more.

With all the news about drought and fires as of late, one might think that the sky is falling. I suppose in some places in the West it is, thanks to the ash from yet another wildfire blazing across thousands of acres of forest.

Like a self-conscious teenager, Colorado mountain towns have grown up with a bit of a psychological complex. Let’s call it the “Fear of Growing Uncool Problem” — FOG-ing UP, for short.

As an independent nurse anesthesiologist (CRNA) who proudly serves three rural hospitals with anesthesia and chronic pain services, I recognize that surgical services are the lifeblood of any rural facility.

Had to be 20 years ago, maybe then some, I ran the iconic photo from the early 1970s, the longshot down Colorado Avenue, above the fold on Page One of The Telluride Daily Planet: dirty Fords and battered pickups, every one of them with a Colorado license plate.

In the face of the most contentious issues, effective leaders have a way of bringing people together. If there is any such need at the moment, it’s over the contentious housing project known as The Corner at Brush Creek.

What better way to guarantee failure of a political proposal than to prevent the question from being asked in the first place? And when all else fails, barring certain groups from weighing in is bound to get the job done.

What do a retired couple who’ve participated in Alaska’s famous Iditarod dog-sledding race, a man who’s riding a weighted down bicycle from Florida to Seattle to raise awareness for wounded veterans, three middle-aged friends spending four days trekking around the San Juan Mountains on foot and a

If you’ve seen one (fill in the blank), you’ve seen them all.

While this old joke could certainly apply to rodeos, Cattlemen’s Days keeps us all coming back, year after year. Why is that?

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